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Happy (sustainable) Holidays! A few low-impact gift ideas

Posted by Kathleen Bottriell on

Hello elves,

It’s that time of the year where we all wrap ourselves up warmly, and slog through the dark mornings. The anticipation of the Christmas break glows like a light at the end of the tunnel, getting us through the mad rush to finish an endless to do list before the end of the year.

I have warm childhood memories of getting up at dawn on Christmas morning to see what Santa had brought us and tearing through wrapping paper to uncover coveted toys. I remember being so disappointed, one year I really wanted a guitar - but my parents borrowed one and gave me a voucher for lessons as a gift. In retrospect I know what a horrible teenager I was, and how sensible my parents were, as the guitar was soon returned after I lost interest. What a waste it would have been if they had bought me a new one (you can read about Gibson guitar’s troubles with illegal tropical logging).

British journalist George Monbiot has written about the environmental problem with Christmas gifts, and gives a shocking statistic that of all materials flowing through the consumer economy, only 1% remain in use six months after sale. Seriously. Put down the solar-powered-waving-queen and think about that one for a minute. It is estimated that households in the UK to produce approximately 750,000 tonnes of extra waste at Christmas time, generating 1.4 million tonnes of CO2 in total.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not a grinch. I love cheesy Christmas music, I love decorating the Christmas tree, stuffing my face with shortbread cookies and rolling my eyes at the awkward family games. But I do not love Christmas gifts. In fact, my husband and I decided a few years ago not to do Christmas gifts anymore. But, for the rest of the family, we still do, and here are some of our best (low impact) ideas:

  1. Excursions and experiences, like going for dinner, spa vouchers, wine tasting, going for a hike…and for your nearest and dearest, including time spent together with you. It doesn’t have to be an official voucher, or even an activity that you have to pay for. Sole Uno, in Rheinfelden, is my go-to gift voucher, and floating in the darkened salt pool is the perfect post-holiday recovery activity.
  2. Food, especially if you are travelling to visit people for the holidays, bring something unique (for example, my mother asked for Ovalmaltine, even though you can get the same thing in Canada, but it’s called Ovaltine there). Of course, there is some impact still involved with food, but it’ still much better than a novelty gift that is never used.
  3. Drinks, like a local wine or set of their favourite mixed drink (think boutique gin, fancy tonic) – and assemble the set yourself (don’t buy the kits in the box, that just makes more packaging waste). Have a look at Sustainable Spirits, which use eco-Pouches, 2.8L poly-laminate pouches which can be used to refill our beautiful silk-screen printed “bottles-for-life”. You can supplement this with beautiful vintage drink glasses you found in the local thrift store.
  4. Donations to charity. I recieved a virtual family of ducks a few years ago, as part of the Oxfam Unwrapped They also have vouchers to support education, women’s empowerment, inequality, children and so on, so you can match this to your recipient’s interests. Just don’t donate on their behalf to ‘The Human Fund’ please!
  5. Something upcycled. We’ve got a few options in our webshop, like this unique wine holder, or vase (both made from old wine barrels), or these wine bottle glasses / tea light holders. For someone really special on your list, you can combine an experience with upcycling: we recommend the Vintage Letters atelier in Basel (the friendly owner will work with you to create an LED-illuminated word of your choice), or Kyburz made, where you can pick the wood they use to create custom furniture from old pallets.
  6. Second-hand. This could be anything – toys, books, kitchen appliances, bicycles, jewellery – you name it, you can find it second-hand. Use the opportunity to explain why you are giving second-hand gifts and if you got it somewhere interesting (like a vintage store, or an antiques) market, tell them the story of how you found it as part of the gift. And finally, if you know someone who wants second-hand or vintage chairs for Christmas, you know where to find us!

We wish you very happy holidays, wherever you are, whatever you celebrate, and we look forward to seeing you in 2019.

Kate and the ecochair.ch team

Read more

Happy (sustainable) Holidays! A few low-impact gift ideas

Posted by Kathleen Bottriell on

Hello elves,

It’s that time of the year where we all wrap ourselves up warmly, and slog through the dark mornings. The anticipation of the Christmas break glows like a light at the end of the tunnel, getting us through the mad rush to finish an endless to do list before the end of the year.

I have warm childhood memories of getting up at dawn on Christmas morning to see what Santa had brought us and tearing through wrapping paper to uncover coveted toys. I remember being so disappointed, one year I really wanted a guitar - but my parents borrowed one and gave me a voucher for lessons as a gift. In retrospect I know what a horrible teenager I was, and how sensible my parents were, as the guitar was soon returned after I lost interest. What a waste it would have been if they had bought me a new one (you can read about Gibson guitar’s troubles with illegal tropical logging).

British journalist George Monbiot has written about the environmental problem with Christmas gifts, and gives a shocking statistic that of all materials flowing through the consumer economy, only 1% remain in use six months after sale. Seriously. Put down the solar-powered-waving-queen and think about that one for a minute. It is estimated that households in the UK to produce approximately 750,000 tonnes of extra waste at Christmas time, generating 1.4 million tonnes of CO2 in total.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not a grinch. I love cheesy Christmas music, I love decorating the Christmas tree, stuffing my face with shortbread cookies and rolling my eyes at the awkward family games. But I do not love Christmas gifts. In fact, my husband and I decided a few years ago not to do Christmas gifts anymore. But, for the rest of the family, we still do, and here are some of our best (low impact) ideas:

  1. Excursions and experiences, like going for dinner, spa vouchers, wine tasting, going for a hike…and for your nearest and dearest, including time spent together with you. It doesn’t have to be an official voucher, or even an activity that you have to pay for. Sole Uno, in Rheinfelden, is my go-to gift voucher, and floating in the darkened salt pool is the perfect post-holiday recovery activity.
  2. Food, especially if you are travelling to visit people for the holidays, bring something unique (for example, my mother asked for Ovalmaltine, even though you can get the same thing in Canada, but it’s called Ovaltine there). Of course, there is some impact still involved with food, but it’ still much better than a novelty gift that is never used.
  3. Drinks, like a local wine or set of their favourite mixed drink (think boutique gin, fancy tonic) – and assemble the set yourself (don’t buy the kits in the box, that just makes more packaging waste). Have a look at Sustainable Spirits, which use eco-Pouches, 2.8L poly-laminate pouches which can be used to refill our beautiful silk-screen printed “bottles-for-life”. You can supplement this with beautiful vintage drink glasses you found in the local thrift store.
  4. Donations to charity. I recieved a virtual family of ducks a few years ago, as part of the Oxfam Unwrapped They also have vouchers to support education, women’s empowerment, inequality, children and so on, so you can match this to your recipient’s interests. Just don’t donate on their behalf to ‘The Human Fund’ please!
  5. Something upcycled. We’ve got a few options in our webshop, like this unique wine holder, or vase (both made from old wine barrels), or these wine bottle glasses / tea light holders. For someone really special on your list, you can combine an experience with upcycling: we recommend the Vintage Letters atelier in Basel (the friendly owner will work with you to create an LED-illuminated word of your choice), or Kyburz made, where you can pick the wood they use to create custom furniture from old pallets.
  6. Second-hand. This could be anything – toys, books, kitchen appliances, bicycles, jewellery – you name it, you can find it second-hand. Use the opportunity to explain why you are giving second-hand gifts and if you got it somewhere interesting (like a vintage store, or an antiques) market, tell them the story of how you found it as part of the gift. And finally, if you know someone who wants second-hand or vintage chairs for Christmas, you know where to find us!

We wish you very happy holidays, wherever you are, whatever you celebrate, and we look forward to seeing you in 2019.

Kate and the ecochair.ch team

Read more


Think global, act local - a few tips

Posted by Kathleen Bottriell on

It's that time of year again, when I head off to Asia for an annual conference on palm oil. That's right, in addition to my work with ecochair, I have a secret life as a sustainability consultant. I've been going to these conferences on and off for close to a decade, and I am always impressed by the number of passionate people working tirelessly, year after year, to solve some of the biggest challenges facing our planet.

However, these days, I feel much more passionate about having an impact where I live, here in the Basel area. The phrase 'think global, act local' has been widely used since the 1970s, and really resonates with me these days. Making good, ecologically responsible choices here, where we live, is as important as working on far-away projects.

There are really simple things you can do every day through your buying habits that will have ripple effects back to the countries where many of the raw materials are grown, mined and extracted and in the world's oceans. Here are some ideas:

1. Never use a plastic bag. If you are getting take-away food, in a little corner shop, or are on holiday somewhere, just tell them you don't want a bag. There are so many options for beautiful, foldable bags these days, there is no excuse.

2. Skip the straw. Unless your jaw is wired shut or you've just had your wisom teeth pulled, you actually don't need that little piece of plastic to consume your drink. After all, humans have consumed beverages for hundreds of thousands of years without the plastic straw (which was only invented in the 1960s, though earlier versions were made from paper, plant tubes and precious metals).

3. Check where your precious metals and diamonds come from. Mining can be have a really negative environmental impact, not to mention slave and child labour that is known to occur, and fund wars. If you want to learn more about work being done in this area, check out the Responsible Jewellery Council,  the Conflict-free Gold Standard and the Kimberly Process.

4. Eat less meat and cheese. Ok, this one's a bit controversial, but all the studies we are seeing these days suggest that reducing meat and dairy products is the single biggest way to reduce your environmental impact on the planet. According to the largest study to date, published in 2018, livestock produces only 18% of calories but takes up 83% of farmland. Apparently reducing these has a far bigger impact than even cutting down on your flights. Start with little steps, like choosing a veggie option at lunch once a week.

5. Resist the temptation to get a new phone every two years. e-waste is a huge problem, not to mention the mining of the rare earth minerals used in the electronics (see above). Try to squeeze out another year, and make sure you take your old phone to be recycled back where you bought. Check out digitech.ch secondhand and refurbished options, instead of buying new!

6. Buy secondhand furniture! We've just launched our map of local secondhand furniture shops, so in addition to ecochair.chh, you can go visit the shops in your neighbourhood.

7. Repair and upcycle what you have. Got a scratch on your table, or waterspots on wood furniture? We'd be happy to give you tips on how to get in looking like new, or even recommend local services for re-painting and upholstery.

That's a few tips to get you started! Do you have more ideas? Let us know.

Now, I'm going to go sleep off my jet lag and count up how much my carbon offset for my flight to Asia will cost. And maybe next year, I will stay here instead.

Kate

 

Read more

Think global, act local - a few tips

Posted by Kathleen Bottriell on

It's that time of year again, when I head off to Asia for an annual conference on palm oil. That's right, in addition to my work with ecochair, I have a secret life as a sustainability consultant. I've been going to these conferences on and off for close to a decade, and I am always impressed by the number of passionate people working tirelessly, year after year, to solve some of the biggest challenges facing our planet.

However, these days, I feel much more passionate about having an impact where I live, here in the Basel area. The phrase 'think global, act local' has been widely used since the 1970s, and really resonates with me these days. Making good, ecologically responsible choices here, where we live, is as important as working on far-away projects.

There are really simple things you can do every day through your buying habits that will have ripple effects back to the countries where many of the raw materials are grown, mined and extracted and in the world's oceans. Here are some ideas:

1. Never use a plastic bag. If you are getting take-away food, in a little corner shop, or are on holiday somewhere, just tell them you don't want a bag. There are so many options for beautiful, foldable bags these days, there is no excuse.

2. Skip the straw. Unless your jaw is wired shut or you've just had your wisom teeth pulled, you actually don't need that little piece of plastic to consume your drink. After all, humans have consumed beverages for hundreds of thousands of years without the plastic straw (which was only invented in the 1960s, though earlier versions were made from paper, plant tubes and precious metals).

3. Check where your precious metals and diamonds come from. Mining can be have a really negative environmental impact, not to mention slave and child labour that is known to occur, and fund wars. If you want to learn more about work being done in this area, check out the Responsible Jewellery Council,  the Conflict-free Gold Standard and the Kimberly Process.

4. Eat less meat and cheese. Ok, this one's a bit controversial, but all the studies we are seeing these days suggest that reducing meat and dairy products is the single biggest way to reduce your environmental impact on the planet. According to the largest study to date, published in 2018, livestock produces only 18% of calories but takes up 83% of farmland. Apparently reducing these has a far bigger impact than even cutting down on your flights. Start with little steps, like choosing a veggie option at lunch once a week.

5. Resist the temptation to get a new phone every two years. e-waste is a huge problem, not to mention the mining of the rare earth minerals used in the electronics (see above). Try to squeeze out another year, and make sure you take your old phone to be recycled back where you bought. Check out digitech.ch secondhand and refurbished options, instead of buying new!

6. Buy secondhand furniture! We've just launched our map of local secondhand furniture shops, so in addition to ecochair.chh, you can go visit the shops in your neighbourhood.

7. Repair and upcycle what you have. Got a scratch on your table, or waterspots on wood furniture? We'd be happy to give you tips on how to get in looking like new, or even recommend local services for re-painting and upholstery.

That's a few tips to get you started! Do you have more ideas? Let us know.

Now, I'm going to go sleep off my jet lag and count up how much my carbon offset for my flight to Asia will cost. And maybe next year, I will stay here instead.

Kate

 

Read more


Summer is blazing - why not float down the Rhein and drop by our shop?

Posted by Kathleen Bottriell on

Hello furniture aficionados,

Summer is blazing away - the city is eerily quiet, except the Rhein, which is bursting with colourful swimbags and their owners (including me). Our shop is very close to the water (just up from Oetlingerstrasse buvette), so why not float all the way down and drop by? Just make sure you check our special summer hours >

Many of your are off in far-flung places on holiday (lucky you!), but we've been around most of the summer, and despite the lethargy-inducing heat, have been busy bees, connecting with old and new old friends around Basel.

One of these is Simone Aïda Baur, a talented Swiss interior designer, based in Basel & Zurich. We met her back in the early days of ecochair.ch at the Start-Up Academy, and this month we're excited to feature some of her insightful tips about moving home, on our blog >

We also had the pleasure of meeting Ken Bourson, who has designed very cool flower vases out of old wine barrels. We got chatting with him at a local flea market, and thought his upcycled product was really aligned with our ecochair.ch mission, so we've now got it in our webshop >

I've been planning a new look for the shop interior, and have been playing with some ideas for the website. But, it's too hot for me so I'm going to pour myself another G&T and wait for the cooler weather before I get to work ;)

Enjoy your summer, folks.

Kate and the ecochair.ch team

Read more

Summer is blazing - why not float down the Rhein and drop by our shop?

Posted by Kathleen Bottriell on

Hello furniture aficionados,

Summer is blazing away - the city is eerily quiet, except the Rhein, which is bursting with colourful swimbags and their owners (including me). Our shop is very close to the water (just up from Oetlingerstrasse buvette), so why not float all the way down and drop by? Just make sure you check our special summer hours >

Many of your are off in far-flung places on holiday (lucky you!), but we've been around most of the summer, and despite the lethargy-inducing heat, have been busy bees, connecting with old and new old friends around Basel.

One of these is Simone Aïda Baur, a talented Swiss interior designer, based in Basel & Zurich. We met her back in the early days of ecochair.ch at the Start-Up Academy, and this month we're excited to feature some of her insightful tips about moving home, on our blog >

We also had the pleasure of meeting Ken Bourson, who has designed very cool flower vases out of old wine barrels. We got chatting with him at a local flea market, and thought his upcycled product was really aligned with our ecochair.ch mission, so we've now got it in our webshop >

I've been planning a new look for the shop interior, and have been playing with some ideas for the website. But, it's too hot for me so I'm going to pour myself another G&T and wait for the cooler weather before I get to work ;)

Enjoy your summer, folks.

Kate and the ecochair.ch team

Read more


Moving Home: Re-doing your style

Posted by Kathleen Bottriell on

For many people, August and September are moving months. Arriving from abroad in time for the start of the school year means that instead of relaxing at a cottage or reading on the beach, you are faced with unpacking and trying to figure out how all your furniture will fit into a new space.

I recently had a chat with Simone Aïda Baur, founder of Global Inspirations Design, and awarding-winning interior designer and blogger, about the challenge of re-doing your interior design as part of a move.

To ship or not to ship?

I have a few international moves under my belt: Canada to the UK, the UK to the US and the US to Switzerland. For these moves, my strategy has been to get rid of almost everything and start again. However, I found with my last one, there were a couple of pieces that I just could not bear to give away – a beautiful antique Chippendale couch, and a small wooden Chinese box table – which I shipped from DC to Basel.

Simone has also had more than her fair share of moving home, having lived in no less than seven countries on three continents, and endured over 25 moves. Given her experience, I asked her about this dilemma, whether or not to move all of your furniture with you. Her advice is that it is a good idea to balance it out, and she told me that ‘unless you are really tight on budget, I would say only keep those items you really love’.

While it may seem tempting to have everything you own loaded in to the shipping container, Simone’s advice is to think twice – ‘each apartment or house is different in terms of architecture, floor space, room division, length of walls and natural daylight, which is why it is better to purchase furniture that fits the space’. Normally Swiss apartments and houses are smaller than what people are used to abroad (unless you are moving from Singapore or Hong Kong!), and Simone and I swapped stories about clients who had shipped their furniture to Switzerland, only to find that it did not physically fit into the space and had to be stored or sold. Matching the floor can also be a problem – they love their tile floors in Switzerland, which just doesn’t quite look right with more ornate furniture.

Professionally mix and match

So, fast forward a few months and you’ve arrived in Switzerland with only a handful of treasured furniture items, and you’re ready to hit the furniture shops. I asked Simone what her tips were for combining existing furniture with new purchases, to make sure the overall style still works. Her advice is to ‘find a common denominator, such as the material, the colour or the shape of your furniture and accessories’She explained that this way you create an overall cohesive look, to which you can then always add an element of surprise, such as a bold coloured wall, some artwork or a unique area rug.

I’ve tried to do this in my own home with a kind of ‘quirky nature’ theme, with (mis-matched) vintage wood furniture, blue and green soft furnishings, plants and fun animal accents (yes, I have a gold squirrel). And my husband gets to display his handcrafted wooden surfboards in the living room, so everyone is happy. It’s definitely eclectic, but in my opinion, still manages to pull it all together.

It costs how much?!

Those of you who love high-end design furniture will know that this doesn’t come cheap (but it’s oh-so-beautiful). However, moving to Switzerland cranks this up a whole other level, and even mid-range furniture can be eye-wateringly expensive. Suddenly your relocation budget may look very small.

To get the most out of your budget, Simone recommends that you ‘first need to get clear as to what it is you really want in terms of functionality and design’. You can do this with the help of an interior designer like Simone, or do it yourself. Sketch out the layout, and what sort of design style you want before you start shopping, and think about how the pieces will go together. This will help avoid expensive mistakes – I once had a friend that loved the look of a couch so much she bought it without measuring her living room properly. Ten years later the small living room is still all couch and no room.

As you probably know, ecochair.ch is a social enterprise committed to reduce our impact on the planet, so we would also encourage you to think about incorporating high quality second-hand, design and vintage furniture pieces into your design. For example, if there is a beautiful (new) design piece that you have fallen in love with, go for the splurge, and compensate this purchase with a less expensive, high quality second-hand pieces in other parts of the room. Things like bookshelves, side tables, and even dining tables can blend into the background, as long as you keep them the same sort of style.  You also might find some unique vintage or second-hand design pieces, like lamps or lounge chairs, that add interesting focal points. 

If you’ve got the time (but not wads of cash), consider investing in advice from a professional interior designer like Simone for tips on layout and design, and then scouring the internet (like our website, ecochair.ch), brockis and flea markets for the furniture you need. It is possible to find high quality second-hand design pieces at discounted prices, but you will normally need to arrange and pay for the delivery yourself (except of course at ecochair.ch, where transportation is normally always included in the Basel area).

Feeling inspired yet? We are! With many thanks to Simone for the chat and tips.

Want to hear more of Simone’s tips?

Tune in to Simone’s regular radio segment during the English Show on Radio X. Her next segment ‘Moving home’ airs on Tuesday August 7th between 18:30 – 20:00. You can also listen to the podcast later.

Attend her interior design workshop in Zurich, on Saturday, September 8th – the theme is ‘Never buy the wrong furniture again’. Tickets available here >

One-on-one interior design coaching and/or personal shopping with Simone. More details here>

Read more

Moving Home: Re-doing your style

Posted by Kathleen Bottriell on

For many people, August and September are moving months. Arriving from abroad in time for the start of the school year means that instead of relaxing at a cottage or reading on the beach, you are faced with unpacking and trying to figure out how all your furniture will fit into a new space.

I recently had a chat with Simone Aïda Baur, founder of Global Inspirations Design, and awarding-winning interior designer and blogger, about the challenge of re-doing your interior design as part of a move.

To ship or not to ship?

I have a few international moves under my belt: Canada to the UK, the UK to the US and the US to Switzerland. For these moves, my strategy has been to get rid of almost everything and start again. However, I found with my last one, there were a couple of pieces that I just could not bear to give away – a beautiful antique Chippendale couch, and a small wooden Chinese box table – which I shipped from DC to Basel.

Simone has also had more than her fair share of moving home, having lived in no less than seven countries on three continents, and endured over 25 moves. Given her experience, I asked her about this dilemma, whether or not to move all of your furniture with you. Her advice is that it is a good idea to balance it out, and she told me that ‘unless you are really tight on budget, I would say only keep those items you really love’.

While it may seem tempting to have everything you own loaded in to the shipping container, Simone’s advice is to think twice – ‘each apartment or house is different in terms of architecture, floor space, room division, length of walls and natural daylight, which is why it is better to purchase furniture that fits the space’. Normally Swiss apartments and houses are smaller than what people are used to abroad (unless you are moving from Singapore or Hong Kong!), and Simone and I swapped stories about clients who had shipped their furniture to Switzerland, only to find that it did not physically fit into the space and had to be stored or sold. Matching the floor can also be a problem – they love their tile floors in Switzerland, which just doesn’t quite look right with more ornate furniture.

Professionally mix and match

So, fast forward a few months and you’ve arrived in Switzerland with only a handful of treasured furniture items, and you’re ready to hit the furniture shops. I asked Simone what her tips were for combining existing furniture with new purchases, to make sure the overall style still works. Her advice is to ‘find a common denominator, such as the material, the colour or the shape of your furniture and accessories’She explained that this way you create an overall cohesive look, to which you can then always add an element of surprise, such as a bold coloured wall, some artwork or a unique area rug.

I’ve tried to do this in my own home with a kind of ‘quirky nature’ theme, with (mis-matched) vintage wood furniture, blue and green soft furnishings, plants and fun animal accents (yes, I have a gold squirrel). And my husband gets to display his handcrafted wooden surfboards in the living room, so everyone is happy. It’s definitely eclectic, but in my opinion, still manages to pull it all together.

It costs how much?!

Those of you who love high-end design furniture will know that this doesn’t come cheap (but it’s oh-so-beautiful). However, moving to Switzerland cranks this up a whole other level, and even mid-range furniture can be eye-wateringly expensive. Suddenly your relocation budget may look very small.

To get the most out of your budget, Simone recommends that you ‘first need to get clear as to what it is you really want in terms of functionality and design’. You can do this with the help of an interior designer like Simone, or do it yourself. Sketch out the layout, and what sort of design style you want before you start shopping, and think about how the pieces will go together. This will help avoid expensive mistakes – I once had a friend that loved the look of a couch so much she bought it without measuring her living room properly. Ten years later the small living room is still all couch and no room.

As you probably know, ecochair.ch is a social enterprise committed to reduce our impact on the planet, so we would also encourage you to think about incorporating high quality second-hand, design and vintage furniture pieces into your design. For example, if there is a beautiful (new) design piece that you have fallen in love with, go for the splurge, and compensate this purchase with a less expensive, high quality second-hand pieces in other parts of the room. Things like bookshelves, side tables, and even dining tables can blend into the background, as long as you keep them the same sort of style.  You also might find some unique vintage or second-hand design pieces, like lamps or lounge chairs, that add interesting focal points. 

If you’ve got the time (but not wads of cash), consider investing in advice from a professional interior designer like Simone for tips on layout and design, and then scouring the internet (like our website, ecochair.ch), brockis and flea markets for the furniture you need. It is possible to find high quality second-hand design pieces at discounted prices, but you will normally need to arrange and pay for the delivery yourself (except of course at ecochair.ch, where transportation is normally always included in the Basel area).

Feeling inspired yet? We are! With many thanks to Simone for the chat and tips.

Want to hear more of Simone’s tips?

Tune in to Simone’s regular radio segment during the English Show on Radio X. Her next segment ‘Moving home’ airs on Tuesday August 7th between 18:30 – 20:00. You can also listen to the podcast later.

Attend her interior design workshop in Zurich, on Saturday, September 8th – the theme is ‘Never buy the wrong furniture again’. Tickets available here >

One-on-one interior design coaching and/or personal shopping with Simone. More details here>

Read more


Lounging around on garden chairs

Posted by Kathleen Bottriell on

What a busy few weeks we've had: spring cleaning, photographing and showing furniture, doing a bit of sanding, and planning upcoming events. We've also got the one year anniversary of the shop coming up, can you believe it?

Read more

Lounging around on garden chairs

Posted by Kathleen Bottriell on

What a busy few weeks we've had: spring cleaning, photographing and showing furniture, doing a bit of sanding, and planning upcoming events. We've also got the one year anniversary of the shop coming up, can you believe it?

Read more